You are here: Home News Repairs to flood damaged fencing along Tyrrell and Lalbert creeks are almost finished.

Repairs to flood damaged fencing along Tyrrell and Lalbert creeks are almost finished.

Crews from the Mallee Catchment Management Authority’s (CMA) Flood Recovery Environmental Employment Program (FREEP) have been working to remove, replace and repair protective fencing that was damaged by the floods during January and February.

Repairs to flood damaged fencing along Tyrrell and Lalbert creeks are almost finished.

FREEP crew members repairing protective fencing.

The work crews consisted of Sunraysia irrigators, who were employed through the flood recovery program after being severely affected by the floods. The work the crews have done at Tyrrell and Lalbert creeks is an example of the restoration and protection work program participants have completed at priority environmental sites across the Victorian Mallee.

Mallee CMA board chairperson Sharyon Peart said the work at Tyrrell and Lalbert creeks was particularly important because it will help to protect large areas of environmental significance.

“So far, the work crews have installed 47.24 kilometres of new fences and repaired 30.5 kilometres of fences along the Tyrrell Creek,” Ms Peart said.

“This fencing is helping to protect an area of 1641.5 hectares, while the work at Lalbert Creek has included the installation of 20.5 kilometres of new fencing to protect 202 hectares.”

Ms Peart said the extensive fencing and protection works at Tyrrell and Lalbert creeks was a great achievement would see the creeks’ riparian zones flourish.

“To have almost completed the repair works at these sites is fantastic and it’s important we continue to maintain such valuable ecosystems in our region,” she said.

“These waterways act as an important linear corridor, providing habitat for flora and fauna.”

While the floods caused significant damage, the water also brought new life to the creek systems and increased the natural habitat for plants, birds, and reptiles, including many threatened species such as the Carpet Python.

The installation of new fencing also created the chance to test new fencing styles, with both ‘lift up’ and ‘drop down’ sections installed at road crossing and step-over gates built-in for pedestrian access.

Gates are provided for adjoining land owners and DSE pest, plant and animal monitors with limited grazing occasionally allowed.

Land holders with fences along the creeks that require attention can contact Crown Frontage Officer, Kevin Forbes at the Mallee CMA on 5051 4354.

 

 

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